As mentioned in an earlier blog post, material selection, types of equipment used, and form factor or part presentation all affect the cost of die cut parts.

In the converting world, raw material costs typically are the main cost driver; usually 50-75 percent  of the overall costs. In this post, we’ll explore this topic a bit more.

On the Print

Oftentimes, specific materials are listed on the drawing or print of a die cut part. This is not a bad thing, but it can have unintended consequences,particularly if the print has not been updated in some time. Older materials with a higher cost structure can become ingrained in the buying process, and newer or lower cost materials are overlooked.

Higher Performance Materials

Depending on the application, there might be higher performance products available that will enhance the overall performance of the die cut part. This could be through higher adhesion, enhanced temperature performance, or better load bearing capabilities. Converters have access to a significant amount of technical information that can help you make the best choice.

New Products

Sometimes we see old prints that call out materials that have been surpassed by newer offerings. While it’s nice to know that the older materials are still available, they may not be the best choice now, particularly if you are looking at light-weighting or cost reduction efforts in a new program.

Lower Cost Materials

Raw material suppliers constantly introduce new materials. Some of these new offerings are designed to reduce costs while others are to increase performance.  Converters who have access to the newest materials can assist you with making the best choice at the right price point for your application.

Ask us!

Do you have questions about materials and die cutting costs? Tom Brown, Inc. is an experienced converter and can help you to find the best material for your application. Contact us today!